Suggestions to help Elive


#1

Hey fine folks and fellow Elive users,

@Thanatermesis I love the work and all the passion and effort that you have put in to make Elive a fantastic distribution. It is a great project that I totally believe in, and that is why I support it, and you on Patreon.

I know there are a lot of questions about the viability and future of Elive, and I would hate to see such a fantastic project end. So these are just some suggestions, and ideas that I am throwing at the wall to see what @Thanatermesis take on them are.

I think one of the biggest criticisms that Elive faces currently is the complaints about things being out-of-date, the kernel, the drivers, etc. I think it is a valid criticism, regardless of the reasons, it does not make the critique, or concern any less valid. So I think to help with that and keep Elive more up to date and to make your life easier @Thanatermesis so you dont have so much to maintain would be to take a look at some of the existing tools available out in the wider Linux community, and perhaps maybe rebase onto an active base. Be it the next version of Debian or perhaps an LTS of Ubuntu which has a 5 year life as opposed to Debian stables 3 years.

I think if we can weed out what you don’t have to maintain we can streamline Elive to make it easier on you @Thanatermesis and help keep it more up to date. I would really suggest that perhaps we reach out to the folks over at Bodhi as they are one of the very few distros running on a e17/moksha desktop I definitely think there is a lot of good potential there to help one another. Another recommendation would be perhaps to different installers so that is one less tool that has to be maintained. Anaconda/ Calamares, or the Ubuquity installer or even the Debian installer perhaps?

Again these are just some suggestion and overall ideas for the project to start a discussion. I love the work and the project and want to see it flourish well into the future, and I totally believe in the work @Thanatermesis has done and continues to do.


#2

On the Upside, try Elive Linux vs. any other recent Linux on a ‘Samsung NC10 Netbook’ (32bit only).
Spoiler: Debian 8 and above, Ubuntu since 14.04 and Backtrack since it is Kali are no fun.

There are a lot of systems out there, using for example legacy Graphic-Cards. It is no fun to use a old Nvidia Card, not supported by newer proprietary Nvidia-driver or free nouveau. Same with fglrx/radeon.
The benefit of ‘using old hardware fast with eyecandy’ should be not forgotten. For this reason it would be great to combine Elive and Skolelinux! Even in ‘first world schools’ the Classroom for IT is not bleeding edge. And coming to BYOD, we only need to provide reliable protocols and interfaces.

The only improvement I recommend to use Elive on a legacy system is: replace the old HDD with a SSD (240 GB costs below 50e in Germany, today).

Let us think how we can change the mindest from ‘outdated’ to ‘stable and reliable’.


#3

While I agree with what you are saying we also have to realize that given the timeframe for future planning that if 15 year old hardware to now is the age range for machines elive is meant for so not to long from now that will rule out 32bit machines, as we are going on 13 plus years now that 64 bit machines and processors have become the norm. Not just in the “first world schools”, by the time any revamp or rebase or new release would potentially be done we would be looking at 15 plus years of 64 bit machines being out in the wild. While 32 bit has it’s place. I think that we need to be looking ahead of the curve a bit and not just the here and now.